WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018

Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – prevention and education Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – testing and diagnosis Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – disease management and clinical care
Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – workforce development Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – enabling environment Icon: Links to WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – research, evaluation and surveillance

The goals of this strategy are aligned with the goals of the Second National Hepatitis B Strategy 2014–2017 (external site) and are:

  • to reduce the transmission of, and morbidity and mortality caused by, hepatitis B
  • to minimise the personal and social impact for people living with hepatitis B.

The WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 aims to achieve these goals through a strong partnership approach and collective action between government, non-government, healthcare, and research organisations.

Hepatitis B (Healthy WA) is an important public health issue. If not treated, chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious liver disease, including cirrhosis, liver cancer, and in some cases, liver failure. Hepatitis B is vaccine preventable.

In 2014 there were 639 notifications for hepatitis B in Western Australia (WA). Of these notifications:

  • 24 were newly acquired (evidence of the disease having been acquired in the 24 months prior to diagnosis)
  • 615 were unspecified (infections of unknown duration).

Download the WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 (PDF 1.1MB).

Strategic context

The Auckland Statement (external site) on viral hepatitis sets targets to:

  • increase vaccination against hepatitis B among those at greatest risk
  • ensure those living with hepatitis B are diagnosed
  • increase the number of people living with hepatitis B who are accessing treatment.

National

In 2014 the Australian Government Department of Health launched the Second National Hepatitis B Strategy 2014–2017 (external site). The strategy provides direction for coordinated action to:

  • reduce new hepatitis B infections
  • achieve and maintain high levels of hepatitis B vaccination
  • increase the proportion of people with chronic hepatitis B who have been diagnosed
  • increase access to appropriate management and care for people with chronic hepatitis B
  • reduce the burden of disease attributed to chronic hepatitis B
  • eliminate the negative impact of stigma, discrimination, legal, and human rights issues on people’s health.

Western Australia

Western Australia has made progress in recent years, through the Implementation Plan for Western Australia for the National Hepatitis B Strategy 2010–2013 (PDF 2.9MB). That plan included key priorities outlined in the First National Hepatitis B Strategy 2010–2013 (external site).

The WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 follows on from the previous Implementation Plan and aligns with the national strategy and the Auckland Statement to address the needs of people living with, and affected by, hepatitis B in WA.

Significant progress has been made in recent years including:

Priority populations

Priority populations for this hepatitis B strategy include:

  • people living with hepatitis B
  • people from countries with a high prevalence of hepatitis B
  • Aboriginal people
  • children born to mothers with hepatitis B
  • people who inject drugs
  • people in custodial settings
  • other unvaccinated people who may be at higher risk of infection.

Monitoring and evaluation

Progress against the WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 will be collated in the WA Hepatitis B Strategy 2015–2018 – Monitoring and Evaluation Framework. This will be updated regularly.

Other useful sources of data relating to hepatitis B include the:

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